The Blue Jean Gnome’s Other Home is The Social Network Show®

Jim & Dr. J proudly display Las Vegas Mayor's Proclamation of "The Social Network Show.com Day"

Hello to my valued subscribers here at MyBlueGenome®. Thank you for signing up to receive notice of new blog posts. Please, make my day and send along a little Hello through Contact Us or mybluegenome@gmail.com. This message is about my weekly podcast, which is called The Social Network Show®.  You are right, this show is not about genetic carriers.  But if you’d like to get to know me a bit better, please give it a listen! And if YOU would like to do an online radio show about genetics or genetic carriers just get in touch through questions@thesocialnetworkstation.com We (my  Read more...

Why Meaning Cannot Depend Upon Lasting

Many belief systems rest on the hope or conviction that somehow, in some form, our life does not end, that the effort we put into something (our spiritual or intellectual development, our children’s lives, a desired change in our community or nation) will not wind up all “for naught,” that something will go on, that what we do in our life will “matter”now or in the future. On a supra-level, cosmically or evolutionarily, simply continuing our genetic material, sending our genome out into the future, is probably at the root of pronatalism, the stubborn belief that begetting or bearing children  Read more...

When Genetic Conditions Result In Learning Disabilities

An increasing number of prospective parents are availing themselves of genetic screening before conception.  However, I think it safe to say that awareness of being a genetic carrier still usually follows the diagnosis of at least one of the parents’ children.  That being the case, many subscribers to this blog are faced with the challenge of rearing a family with disability. Many times in the course of my daily errands I reflect on how much more laborious and time-consuming they would be for a person without a fully functioning body.  How tired one gets from every little thing requiring great  Read more...

Deep Thoughts from a Beef Geneticist about Genetic Carriers

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I have Google Alerts set to send me a message each time “genetic carrier” is mentioned on the web (or at least that part of the web indexed by Google).  Today it led me to a great blog post by an assistant prof at University of Missouri who is a beef genetics specialist.  You humans will appreciate most of what he wrote!  The title will tip you off:  The Truth—Every Living Thing is a Genetic Defect Carrier.  Yes, persons who are aware of being a carrier of a problematic gene or two take a certain amount of comfort in knowing  Read more...

BRCA2 prompts prostate surgery

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Knowing your genome can help you get the jump on diseases for which you are at risk.  A man in Britain with BRCA2 opted for prostatectomy even though he had no symptoms. http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_303865.asp   The BioNews article contains a number of links to additional articles on this topic, one of which reports the man’s removed prostate was discovered to be cancerous after all. Do you think you would opt for preventive surgery if you discover a genetic predisposition for serious illness? What factors would you consider?  Read more...

What’s God got to do with it?

I’m a real sucker for animal videos on YouTube and came across this edited version of an earlier post which I had enjoyed a lot. The new one added a very lovely musical background and several captions. (Cllick “Read More” if the video isn’t visible yet.) I have to ask about one caption, though, “What is ‘God doesn’t make mistakes’ supposed to mean?” It’s one thing when a little girl says “God didn’t make a mistake when he made me” (the source of the caption). Her parents gave her a way of forestalling those who would look down on her  Read more...

Finding Out

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Your baby has just been diagnosed with a genetic disorder.  Before you can really grasp that, the doctor recommends that you and your partner have genetic tests to find out whether you are carriers. In other words, whether this disorder came from you. Which one of you? Either one? Both?  It’s bad enough to find out your child is sick, will have life-long problems, or maybe even a really short life. Now you find out she got it from you. Nice. Really nice. ‘Course you’re also wondering about your other child. It’s going to be weeks before the results come in.  Read more...

Genetic Testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2

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Most breast cancer is not hereditary.  Available estimates say that genetic susceptibility (among white women) is involved in 5 to 10% of breast malignancies and 10 to 15% of ovarian cancers (BRCA mutations can cause either). We all possess wonderful genes called tumor suppressors. Two of the genes known to suppress breast and ovarian cancer tumors are called BRCA1 and BRCA2.  BRCA (pronounced brack’ uh) stands for BReast CAncer.  Normally, we have two healthy copies of each tumor suppressor gene.  When a mutation, or change, occurs causing one gene to work incorrectly, the cell can still continue to suppress abnormal  Read more...

Genetic mutations in older fathers’ sperm linked to autism

Read more about this in BioNews newsletter, April 16, 2012: http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_138787.asp  Read more...

Don’t Blame Mother

©Bryan Sikora/Shutterstock

It shouldn’t be about blame, of course, in the first place. But, what is incomplete about the diagram below? When a child is diagnosed with an X-linked recessive disorder, the inheritance pattern is often illustrated with a diagram like this one. Notice where the buck stops. What could going back one more previous generation reveal? There are (at least) five possibilities. First, let’s be clear, the mother might not be a carrier to begin with. There might not have been a genetic alteration previous to the diagnosed child; the mutation (to use the “m-word”) just sprang up suddenly in the  Read more...